Dow Chemicals Applies Six Sigma to Prioritize RFID Projects


Posted by: meikah | 22 November 2009 | 9:05 pm

Dow Chemicals has long been a Six Sigma advocate—from improving its operations to getting its VOC, and even when embarking on innovation.

The latest news has it that Dow is again applying Six Sigma to determine which RFID projects to tackle in Generation 1.  Dow’s Six Sigma steps included:

  • Listening to the “Voice of the Customer” by educating 100 leading business leaders within Dow about active and passive RFID and GPS and then listening to how these technologies might apply to their businesses.
  • Dow put together a list of 450 ideas, came up with a list 50 prioritized project areas, and then culled this down to the 10 projects that would be implemented in Generation 1, a time period covering 2006 to 2008.

Read more…

Filed under: Dow Chemical Co., RFID, Six Sigma

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Six Sigma and RFID


Posted by: meikah | 2 June 2009 | 10:04 pm

Six Sigma works well with data. So in cases where data is not easy to get or gather, you need to have a system that will do it.

In an article on RFID Journal, the example given where customer data is not easy to gather and measure, is the retail business. When a customer gets in the store, for example, the store employees won’t always know if the customer is able or fails to locate, on shelves, the products they want to buy. Or for their supply chain there is a discrepancy in the supply and demand.

For these cases, radio frequency identification (RFID), can help.

By capturing data regarding the movement of goods at every point in the supply chain, RFID can provide information that indicates only 95 were shipped. And by taking daily inventory counts, the retailer knows that units are being stolen, and can therefore inform suppliers to replenish more quickly, thereby ensuring that fewer sales are lost. Moreover, companies can analyze data to see where problems occur in the supply chain and in the store, so that corrective actions can be taken.


If all items had been tracked with RFID and the data had been analyzed properly, the retailer would have had a clearer picture of demand, based on more accurate in-store inventory counts. And armed with that information, the company would have then been able to provide more accurate data to its partners, thus enabling them to replenish more effectively.

Read more…

According to the article this is one of the ways to achieve Six Sigma retailing.

Related posts:
Six Sigma and TAGSYS 
Subjecting RFID Tags to Six Sigma

Filed under: Retail, RFID, Six Sigma, Supply Chain

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Six Sigma and TAGSYS


Posted by: meikah | 22 March 2007 | 12:28 am

TAGSYS, the global leader in item-level RFID systems and tags, has announced that they are launching a Six Sigma Performance Program initially for pharmaceuticals. The program guarantees no more than four failures per million reads for high frequency (13.56 MHz) passive RFID tags used for item-level pharmaceutical product tracking.

With this new program, TAGSYS is hopeful it will bring in new confidence in RFID quality-of-service (QoS) that pharmaceutical companies need for large-scale deployments.

The service is initially for the pharmaceutical industry to facilitate track-and-trace applications, but it could be expanded to other industries. Jordon cited the results Cardinal Health released last year from its UHF Gen2 item-level tagging pilot as an example of how low performance expectations are a barrier to adoption (see Pharmaceutical RFID Pilot Finds Promise, Problems). Cardinal said it learned a lot from its pilot and considered the program a success, but attained a top item-level read rate of 99.5 percent for one operation and a low of 7.8 percent for another. Case-level read rates ranged from 76.3 to 100 percent.

Read more about TAGSYS RFID Six Sigma Performance System…

Source:
RFID Update, “TAGSYS Guarantees Six Sigma RFID Performance” with the link provided by Six Sigma Zone

*Photo credit: RFID Journal

Filed under: Manufacturing, Pharmaceuticals, RFID, Software/Technology

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